The intricacies of art uncovered

Time-lapse offers a unique visual perspective by manipulating the natural progression of time, so is perfect for capturing creative activities that take place over particularly long durations of time.

Tracking the progress of something over longer periods of time can be especially rewarding, as the results appear more pronounced and dramatic when shown as part of a condensed sequence.

But it is also being used on short-term projects and to track very quick activity, particularly in the art world. World-famous artist Charming Baker is just one of many professional and amateur artists now utilising this photography technique.


SWEET nothing from Charming Baker on YouTube.

In this blog post we feature a selection of time-lapse videos from across the Internet that showcase the intricate processes associated with art as much as the finished artworks themselves.

 

It is perhaps most satisfying for the viewer if a work of art reproduces a familiar subject and this charcoal portrait of Emma Watson is no exception.

Emma Watson Portrait Drawing video from ThePortraitArt on YouTube.

Time-lapse lends itself well to the ‘layering’ technique involved in the art of drawing.

The video clearly shows the various stages of application, from initially marking out key features, blocking out certain shadows and areas of shade, as well as final texturing details.

 

Utilising a layering technique on a much larger scale in this time-lapse video, portraiture artist David Walker uses spray paints to develop this signature style.

David Walker Art basel 2013 Wynwood – Timelapse from The Greatest Trick on Vimeo.

Without the aid of brushes, David uses a multi-layered style, which incorporates both sophisticated and dumb-mark markings to create numerous lines and abstract areas that ‘weave together through clashing colours, translucent drips and decaying letterforms.’

David’s work aims to challenge preconceptions about fine art and urban painting by fusing photo-realism, abstraction and graffiti art sensibilities.

 

Although not strictly art, the arduous process involved in completing this incredibly unique puzzle is made visible in the time-lapse.

1000 Colours Timelapse – Long from Jacky Winter on Vimeo.

Entitled 1000 Colours, the puzzle measures approximately 50x70cm and every piece is a separate solid colour. Once its fully assembled the puzzle reveals a full CMYK colour palette, with a satisfying artistic feel to the finished challenge.

 

We have shared more art-based time-lapse edits in some of our previous blogs, including videos featuring magnetic putty and cheese!

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